Posts Tagged With: Domaine Ganevat

Domaine Buronfosse

Over in Auckland where I’m based at present, there are very few Jura wines available, in fact there are very few French wines from the smaller appellations. It is not surprising really with such a tiny population and such an important wine production in its own country. It’s worth remembering that only ten years ago, there were hardly any Jura wines to be found anywhere outside the Franche-Comté region. Even Paris had little choice.

However, Auckland has one specialist French importer and retailer, Maison Vauron, who does wave the flag for the Jura, having imported a few wines from Stéphane Tissot for several years. I went to see them recently and they told me that they were thinking about adding one more Jura producer to their range and asked me what I thought about Domaine Buronfosse, as one of the partners had been particularly impressed with a Savagnin Ouillé from them.

Based in the far south of the region, in the Sud Revermont – an area best known for its white wines – located in the same hamlet as Domaine Ganevat, Peggy Buronfosse has been quietly building up her wine estate and now her husband Jean-Pascal has joined her. Their reputation for white wines has grown considerably and I find it really exciting that some of their wines will arrive in New Zealand soon.

So, here is the next producer profile excerpt from the book – you have bought the book, haven’t you?? You won’t find the book on Amazon.com (only on Amazon.co.uk) because I couldn’t stand giving them the huge commission they require. But in case you need it you will find the Jura Wine book stockists on this page, along with a few reviews.

Jura Domaine Buronfosse

Jean-Pascal and Peggy Buronfosse outside their home ©Mick Rock/Cephas

Peggy Buronfosse cannot quite get over the fact that her wines are available in trendy New York wine shops and restaurants. She embraces it, but is humble at the same time. Neither she nor her husband Jean-Pascal set out to be vignerons, but they did fervently wish to put down roots and farm somewhere. They landed in the sleepy hamlet of La Combe below Rotalier. Originally from the cities of Lyon and St-Etienne, today whatever this couple do, together with their children, is a lifestyle choice, and however hard the work is they seem to love the various aspects of producing wine.

Entredeux Savagnin Ouillé Buronfosse ©Mick Rock

Domaine Buronfosse Côtes du Jura Entre-Deux is a Savagnin Ouillé, but not stated on the label ©Mick Rock/Cephas

Both Peggy and Jean-Pascal trained in agriculture and their plan was simply to find jobs, keep some animals, have a vegetable garden and source as much of their own food as possible while bringing up their family. Jean-Pascal worked as a teacher in the Lons agricultural college, and vivacious Peggy (or ‘La Peggy’ as she’s known locally) worked in the vineyards for Domaine Joly and got to know her neighbour Jean-François Ganevat. The vine bug hit her and in 2000 Raymond Pageault, an 80-year-old local vigneron who had heard about her, decided that ‘La Peggy’ was the one to take over his steep vineyards. He persuaded the couple to rent his parcels of old vines and their challenge started. Although originally Peggy had to use herbicide, that soon changed and she started, with Jean-Pascal’s help, hoeing the vineyards by hand with the aim of being completely organic. Official conversion started in 2007. Now, having taken on a few more vineyards, they have plots predominating in marl, limestone and schist, mainly in Rotalier and St-Laurent de Grandvaux. To fulfil a long-held wish, they are making plans to get a horse for the family and hope to train it to work in the vineyards.

After a struggle at the start, by the 2004 vintage they were beginning to find private clients through wine shows and wine clubs, and the media began to notice as well. Typically for the Sud Revermont, the emphasis is on whites, but inspired more by Ganevat and Labet than by Joly – the modern Rotalier–Burgundian style. They have several stylish ouillé Chardonnay cuvées, all distinctly different according to their terroir, plus a blend, Belemnites, and a tangy Savagnin ouillé called Entre-Deux; all spend around 18 months in barrel. A first Jaune was released in 2005, there is a tiny amount of red and an exquisite non-approved Vin de Paille named Epicure. Latterly a beautifully pure Chardonnay Crémant has been added to the range.

Buronfosse sign ©Mick RockThis is a venture that remains small and will continue to be so. Although Jean-Pascal gave up his teaching job in 2013 and joined Peggy to work on the domaine, they have no wish to expand the vineyards beyond around 4ha. Their beautiful labels are from paintings by Jean-Pascal’s brother-in-law and reflect the wines and the terroir. These are smiling, thinking people and it shines through in their wines.

Domaine Buronfosse, 2 La Serpentine, La Combe, 39190 Rotalier
Tel: 03 84 25 05 09
Email: buronfossepjp@orange.fr
Contacts: Peggy and Jean-Pascal Buronfosse
Established: 2000
Vineyards: 4ha (Chardonnay, Savagnin, Poulsard, Pinot Noir, Trousseau, mainly white)
Certification: Ecocert
Visits: Tasting room, visits welcomed by appointment

Categories: Jura Wine book excerpts | Tags: , , , , , | Leave a comment

In praise of Château-Chalon

Last month on my very last full research visit in preparation for the book, I spent most of the time around Château-Chalon, visiting producers there and in Ménétru-le-Vignoble, Névy-sur-Seille, Voiteur and Le Vernois. Only 20 minutes south of Arbois, this is in many ways another world, where Savagnin and oxidative wines reign supreme, born of the classic, steep grey marl vineyards below the limestone cliffs of the historic hilltop village of Château-Chalon.

vine conservatory

Vine conservatory below Château-Chalon ©Brett Jones

As well as visiting producers, we were able to sneak in behind the fancy metal doorway to the baby vine conservatory looked after by Gaël Delorme of the Société du Viticulture du Jura. Here, around 50 vine varieties are grown, including not only various versions of Jura’s big five, but all the obscure varieties Gaël has been able to find over the past ten years that were once grown in the region. This include rarities such as Enfariné, Argan, Gueuche Noir and Poulsard Blanc, some of which make their way in tiny quantities into blends made by a few producers. You will have to wait for the book to know more.

We also took a look at the wonderful educational museum of la Maison de la Haute Seille in the middle of the village. If you understand French it’s well worth spending an hour there to look at the interactive displays explaining the geology of the place, as well as history and much more. There is also a beautiful garden with one of the many spectacular Château-Chalon viewpoints over towards the Bresse plain.

sweetbreads

Sweetbreads and girolles in a lemon confit jus

In between both of our birthdays we treated ourselves to a meal at the Restauarant Hostellerie St-Germain d’Arlay that I hadn’t eaten at for some time, and has recently had a makeover, although still with the same owners, the Tupins. It was a really excellent meal, the restaurant is worthy of a Michelin star, but for now doesn’t have one, which is probably good for prices. The dilemma of what to drink was ever-present, but after an aperitif of elegant Crémant from Michel Gahier, we decided on a great value Ganevat Cuvée Oregane 2010 – his Savagnin/Chardonnay blend. I rarely get to drink Ganevat, and on visits to him it’s usually a barrel rather than bottle tasting, so this was the ideal opportunity to relax with a bottle and good food – lovely purity of ripe yellow fruits dominated.

Back in Château-Chalon, when we were there in mid-September the Savagnin grapes were a long way from ready, although the very low crop, caused by problems earlier in the year with cold and rain before and during flowering, means that with the September sunshine they can ripen quicker. Château-Chalon is the only AOC in France to have three quality control examinations – once at the vines before harvest, once as wine in vat and a final one after the requisite years of barrel ageing under the veil, before bottling in its special Château-Chalon-engraved clavelin.

Château-Chalon vineyards

View up to the vineyards and village of Château-Chalon from Névy-sur-Seille ©Brett Jones

The inspection committee toured the vineyards of Château-Chalon, checking the grapes for ripeness and health, yesterday 3rd October and have declared the vintage suitable for making the AOC in 2013 (not as in 2001 last time it was rejected). Picking may begin next Wednesday 9th October, though I expect many will wait longer if the weather permits. With the pressure of writing and the distance from my home, I could not attend the inspection, so instead celebrated with a glass of delicious, delicate and elegant Domaine De Lahaye Château-Chalon 2005 from Guillaume Tissot of Névy sur Seille – open over two weeks and just hitting its best!

Do take a look at the old news reel video of Harvest in Château-Chalon 1968 for a taste of nostalgia and the romance of harvest. And then you might like to view my offering, shot from above the village of Névy-sur-Seille and showing all the vineyards of the four villages eligible for AOC Château-Chalon, which also include Ménétru-le-Vignoble and Domblans.

Categories: Images of Jura, Jura culture, News | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

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